Monday, May 26, 2014

Sweden got Borged

One of the amazing "accomplishments" of the neoliberals is their ability to find obscure statistics to justify their madness.  They do it everywhere but the BS just seems deeper in Sweden.  There, the head neoliberal is a vain little twerp who is unfortunately the finance minister.  The guy's name is Borg and he has pretty much destroyed everything about the Swedish economy that was praiseworthy.  Naturally, he is a hero of neoliberal rags like the Economist.

One of the reasons a guy like Borg can get away with his nutso prescriptions is that Sweden has been one of the richest countries of the 20th century with an educated populace and a largely corruption-free government.  Someone can do serious damage to an economy like that and still produce some good numbers.  For a while.  But now it seems like the Swedes are wising up to the sham that is neoliberalism.  Too many folks remember what it was like when times were good.  So now the "Moderate" (right-wing) Party that brought Borg into the government is being blamed for the real distress being felt by most Swedes (no matter what the cooked statistics show.)  And over the weekend, the "Moderates" got slapped around by the voters in the EU elections.

As seen in the article below, the knives are out for Borg.  It was probably inevitable.  Sweden just has too many people who understand the real economy to be fooled by the charlatans forever.

'Borg: Sweden's worst ever finance minister'

26 May 2014

In the wake of the Moderates' poor result in the EU elections, contributor Christian Tsangarides takes serious aim at one of the party's supposed stars - Finance Minister Anders Borg and his "borgonomics". 

I’m not impressed by Anders Borg. The Swedish finance minister has been heralded internationally by luminaries such as The Economist and Financial Times for posting strong GDP growth and maintaining high levels of employment since the Alliance took office. This view is a sham.

The financial crisis, which coincided with the right-wing electoral victory of 2008, has benefited the Swedish economy more than any other in the developed world due to reforms to the banking sector made two decades ago. Meanwhile, employment and welfare statistics have been fiddled.

Borg is famed for his arduous weight sessions in the Riksdag gym, where he grunts and groans for all to hear. Yes, he is that guy at the gym, you know the one with the ponytail looking at himself in the mirror, making lots of noise while pumping iron.

There's nothing wrong with this in principle, except that under his watch Sweden has a deflationary economy. Not to mention the fastest growing rate of inequality in the OECD, and we shouldn’t forget the unparalleled youth and migrant unemployment rates (otherwise known as the people who fund the generous pension and welfare systems).

What about the housing bubble? Record levels of household debt? Maybe this is why he grunts so loud, although a change in policy would be a lot more helpful. All these trends have taken off since the Moderates began to control the economy.

The privatization of housing and the transport network is a classic example of the failure of Borgonomics. They provide a nice short-term income boost for the annual accounts while reducing operational costs. Good work Anders. What happens later though?

Anyone can run a profitable line from Stockholm to Gothenburg, but a service from Boden to Kiruna…good luck with that. Rail privatizations consistently fail because a national network, particularly in a country with such low population density as Sweden, is not profitable and private competition reduces state income on the most popular routes.

This incompetence follows on from the policy of the Carl Bildt government of the early 1990s when the Arlanda Express contracts were sold for peanuts until 2040. Private profits, subsidized by the taxpayer of course. Borg, however, rarely uses the Arlanda Express as the taxpayer has kindly spent around 1 million kronor ($152,000) on having the government airplane drop him off at Skavsta so he can have a shorter drive home after meetings.

Most damaging of all his economic mismanagement has been the approach to housing policy. The great sell-off, at rock bottom prices, of public housing will scar the economy for decades. Maybe had Borg lived in the real world, instead of a student apartment, before he became an unelected minister, his decisions would have been better informed.

Housing inflation was already a problem when the Alliance took office. The solution was not to then flood the market with public housing far below the real market value. Speculation has taken off, property prices have risen to new highs, and of course private debt has soared.

A housing bubble together with record levels of private debt, coupled with a deflationary economy isn't a good combination. Selling off public housing when people under the age of 25 are over 400 percent more likely to be unemployed than their older counterparts, is a bad idea. Allowing the kronor to inflate by over 10 percent vis à vis major currencies and your main trade partners, when much of your economic stability comes from manufacturing and exports, is not very helpful either.

Now the Riksbank finds itself in a bind. Raising interest rates would help to cool the market and make speculation less profitable, but that would likely make the unemployment crisis even worse. Lowering rates will punish savers and keep the bubble growing. Throw in the deflationary crisis and the costs of Borg’s austerity politics will take a long time to pay off.

Borg has presented the Swedish economy as booming, arguing that liberalization has been beneficial for employment and the GDP. In reality it’s more like the competitive body builder which he may have been more suited for. All oiled up and high on steroids the impression is of a glistening economy which has outperformed much of the EU during his reign.

The problem with juicing yourself up though is that it’s not good for your health in the long run, and because of the Borg agenda the next global crisis will hit Sweden a lot harder than 2008 did. more

1 comment:

  1. CONCLUSION :- " Downward trend in world economy is likely to be in mild form during
    November, 2014 to April, 2015, to grow somewhat intense during May, 2015
    to October, 2015, becomes harsh during November, 2015 to July, 2016.
    Such areas of life as minerals and metals, foodcrops, energy resources , defence and security of nations are likely to bear the brunt of these trends.
    Collective wisdom in decision making, communication systems, aviation industry, and the cinema , music and TV industries are also , in addition, likely to be touched by these trends.
    Countries or regions whose names begin with the letters B , E , EU, N, O, P, U or V may need to implement multilevel approach to challenges during this period".

    This is the substance or salient feature of my article - " Stressful times ahead for world economy in 2015 and 2016"- published online on June 2, this year at

    kushal kumar